Posts Tagged ‘Nature’

Memories

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

Have you ever noticed how a song can take you back to your childhood or some long stashed away memory?  The same can be said about a smell, like a special recipe your mom made when you were a child or perhaps a particular flower. Even taste has its place in the storing of your lifetimes worth of experiences. The fact is that “all” of our senses seem to help attach themselves to a special moment of our lives and have the ability to open that part of our mind as if giving us an old unique key to a hidden door that we can suddenly peak into.  Amazingly our senses give us the ability to add a sort of protective layer around particular moments in time that might have been otherwise forgotten. Each second of everyday we are bombarded with information of some kind or another and its easy to see how many of the details become lost in the pile of countless pieces of information. By heightening the overall experience at the time of the event, it’s like using a yellow highlight marker on a particular sentence buried in 10,000 words. Suddenly its easy to find that particular spot.

Image from healthmango.com

Understanding how or why that works is fairly simple, think of it another way; imagine if you were to eat 1 bowl of plain oatmeal every day for 100 days and I asked you about your experience on one “particular” meal you probably would have no idea. You would also be pretty sick of eating oatmeal. Sure maybe you would remember the first bowl, or the last might stand out a bit but most meals would sort of blend over time. Now imagine one particular meal you were surprised because unexpectedly added into the bowl was smelly and super powerful hot sauce. Suddenly, that meal no matter which of the 100 days, stands out as unique. Years later if you smell or taste that same hot sauce you would certainly remember that moment in time and a large part of that day would probably come flooding back into your mind.

As we grow from childhood our young minds associate the many things we see, taste, touch, hear and smell with our experiences and those in many ways help create the building blocks of our minds. Since the nature of growing up means many of our memories are from a younger time, we tend to perceive the world with a heightened and nostalgic view. Perhaps an old street you lived on, place you visited as a young person etc becomes sewn into your mind.

Early Spring Nature Walk

Knowing this is a powerful thing for a parent. That means you have the ability to help ensure the experiences and reflections in the life of your child are wonderful ones worthy of that hopefully nostalgic view.  That is exactly why it is so vitally important that we all remember to take our children for walks into natural habitats to admire wildlife and appreciate “their” world. As we walk through a forest, meadow or watershed (or any other habitat) the smells of the trees and flowers, the songs of the birds all fill the senses with the wonder of “life” itself. Something all of us can relate too. That positive impression left in the mind of the child can last a lifetime and the love and endearment of the natural world means that you are helping to building a better future by ensuring people still “care” in future generations.

Imagine a person in government being asked to develop a particular habitat and suddenly hears the song of a bird reminiscent of his or her childhood. Perhaps that will mean that same person has pause before making a decision that would destroy the place that they hold close to their own heart because they would also understand its importance.  Now when I was raised before the internet, cell phones even “cordless homes phones” there wasn’t much reason to stay indoors. In fact I spent all my time outdoors so much so that I grew up to do things like become a conservationist (I like the term “preservationist” better btw). So my experiences as a child did directly impact the course of my own life.

The beauty of a healthy wild place

In today’s high tech world of the iPad and smart phone ensuring constant online communication with websites like Facebook it’s hard to imagine that people have time to be outdoors. As we spend more hours in front of a computer, sadly that means less time to see what is happening in a nearby forest preserve for example.

These experiences are not to be missed at any age, but it is absolutely imperative for a child to see. In nature the scent of wildflowers in a meadow, the sound of a birds, whales and wolves singing or the feeling of bark on a pine tree all create a world of wonder and awe that locks in to your consciousness for a lifetime.  I can remember watching a Luna Moth flying at night against the back drop of the moon or and eagle landing on a salmon and flying off. Those images have forever blended into my heart and my mind is inseparable from that humble feeling of respect. They are so powerful even as the years go by and I forget little things like “why did I just walk into this room” or “what was I looking for in this drawer” I never forget those magical moments exploring the beauty of Mother Nature and I never will. That is the point I suppose. Our “memories” are built on “experiences” so ensuring we spend quality time in places that reflect the best things in life i.e., “Nature” will ensure we hold a lifetime of wonderful building blocks for our future.

Mark Fraser

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org

Youtube

http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark

Twitter

http://twitter.com/NWWMARK

Facebook

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407

Facebook #2

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile

Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!

http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/

Nature Walks with Mark Blog

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized 30 Comments »

Federal Budget Cuts and the Environment

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

When thinking about something’s “value” we often get confused by just exactly what that means. Seeing value in only direct monetary terms is short sided and can easily lead us astray. Think of it this way, compare the “value” of lets say gold, to the “value” of air. We think of air as free, and gold is – well, valuable – how odd is that?   Just imagine that if you take gold away, your fine but take air away and you’ll die. Seems to me that air should have far more value then gold since we can not live without it. Compare diamonds and water – do you see my point? These days we seem to describe something as valuable based on a flawed system. All too often we loose site of what’s really important and take them for granted. The children then grow up in a world where they are taught to hold monitory things as far more important then the natural world, which is dangerous for the well being of everything and is something we need to correct right away. If you replace the word “valuable” with the word “precious” it helps but still we see terms like “precious metals” as opposed to “precious forests”.

Image from forestpolicyresearch.com

How does this poor use of the term valuable lead us astray? Take the recent budget cuts here in the United States. The goal was to cut spending so they pulled money from things considered less important, or to put it another way, less valuable. Being a naturalist all my life I knew what that meant long before anyone itemized the cuts because I have seen this many times. It means that laws protecting the environment, agencies whose job it is to enforce environmental protection even protected wildlife habitat all come under attack. That’s because of the confusion about value. There are those in government that want very much to exploit the natural world for profit and have a long track record of doing exactly that. Trading (air) and (water) for (gold) and (diamonds) when you think about it.

The irony is that I know we are better then this and so do you. I believe the majority of us care, I mean who wants their family to not have air and drinking water?  What I can not understand is why so many of us are all but unaware when these “precious and valuable” natural resources come under attack. Our future depends on our society learning to live “with” the natural world and not in spite of it. We all would rather see a clean and healthy watershed and forest then a devastated one.

Image from Care2.com

In the recent federal budget cuts were things like “lifting protections for gray wolves in Montana and Idaho. Now I am no economist mind you, but how exactly does failing to protect an endangered species help federal budget shortcomings? What that really is all about is special interest groups out west in this particular case, called “ranchers” who have been trying to open up wolves to hunting since they were reintroduced. The Wolf has as much right to exist on public land as any other species does and certainly more right then free roaming domestic cattle in my opinion. They are public lands we are talking about not just a particular piece of private land. Now in my case after being involved with these discussions and paying attention to what has been happening I no longer consume beef. I made that choice many years ago after hearing multiple reports of ranchers killing wolves. I figured that was the one thing I had the immediate power to do and that no one person or organization had the power to control. So instantly I was no longer their customer and therefore stopped supporting their business. When you purchase beef you are funding them after all. We have all heard the term “the customer is always right” because in business you want to protect the relationship with your customers because that is literally how you are paid. The point being if enough of the beef consuming public wants to “protect wolves” we could then demand it of the ranching community by our own purchase decisions. There are some ranchers, that have stood up and “do” actually work with environmental groups to protect their cattle but at the same time not harm the wolves. Those ranchers should get more publicity for their positive contributions and also provide a venue for those in that market. In this way, protecting wolves would become a reality because in the end of the day don’t “we the people” control that money. We just need to put our money in the right places where we see the most “value”. Imagine that instead of the flash mob phenomena simply dancing in a mall, we instead used the power of social media to take control of protecting wildlife by shifting our purchase power.  Rest assure that there is nothing that gets attention to a cause like moving our buying power money around from folks who hold that, as the most… “valuable”

Wolves are “valuable” because a clean and healthy natural world does consist of apex predators.

Image of Earth's water cycle from NASA.gov

Other recent cuts that gave me direct pause were things like the gut wrenching $1 billion from Environmental Protection Agency. Remember the EPA enforces laws to protect against greenhouse gases, clean drinking water etc. Think of what will happen at the hands of coal plants for example, without that level of monitored and safeguards in place. Other groups that received cuts were the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) consisting of industry scientists around the world dealing with the impact of climate change. There was even $407 million from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. Ironic when you think about how they are cutting the funding protecting against greenhouse gases and then cutting the funding for new sciences to help break our dependency on things that produce, greenhouse gases. Projects like high speed rails not only help reduce greenhouse gases by providing alternative commuting but also create jobs so I found that odd that they have even cut funding to a high speed rail system. At the same time as we are talking about federal “overspending” I was curious about how much money was being spent overseas. What does it cost to be in Iraq and Afghanistan these days etc? A quick online search shows that we spent over 1.1 “trillion” (with a T) dollars overseas fighting battles in places that produce oil. A source of energy that creates greenhouse gases. I found this website with a chart showing how fast money is being spent overseas that is actually a near real time view. http://costofwar.com/en/ I am not affiliated with the site so I cant speak about it other then they have a great chart showing the cost.

Now let’s talk again about our use of the term “value”.

According to dictionary.com the top three definitions of value are as follows:

1. relative worth, merit, or importance: the value of a college education; the value of a queen in chess.

2. monetary or material worth, as in commerce or trade: This piece of land has greatly increased in value.

3. the worth of something in terms of the amount of other things for which it can be exchanged or in terms of some medium of exchange.

I still am not really seeing the point of why we think “money” is more “valuable” then “Clean Air”, “Clean Water” and “Wildlife”. I believe we have become confused about what’s important in life and those who would sacrifice all we have for a quick profit are making decisions that will profoundly impact each one of us, our children and the world we all share.

Nothing is more valuable then Mother Earth and its time we recognized that.

Mark Fraser

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org

Youtube

http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark

Twitter

http://twitter.com/NWWMARK

Facebook

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407

Facebook #2

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile

Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!

http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/

Nature Walks with Mark Blog

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized 33 Comments »

Evidence of Alien Life

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

Today I woke to news reports of a NASA scientist stating he has found confirmation of life beyond Earth. That is going very well with my morning coffee.

Now let’s face it most of us new sooner or later we would finally hear about conclusive evidence of alien life. Ironic when you think about how not long ago that might have sent some running into the streets while religious scholars tried to explain away the implications.

Our current generation is just a wee bit more desensitized to new information.  Now since I make films and write specifically about the preservation of wildlife you might wonder what is the connection?  Being a naturalist simply means I spend my life in the admiration of the natural world.  I have always included space in that belief because our whole planet literally floats in the sea of space and when you start to look at the unimaginable size of the known universe it gets really tough to think that life wouldn’t be plentiful in the oceans of the cosmos.

The problem for us is a small one, literally. You see compared to all that, we are not even microscopic. I don’t just mean us, or even our planet for that matter, I mean our entire solar system is just a tiny spec.  Our life giving Sun is actually one single star floating in the Milky Way galaxy with somewhere between 100 and 400 billion “other” stars. It is even estimated there may be as many as 50 “billion” planets in our own galaxy and a real possibility that a huge number is residing in the so-called “habitable zone” distance to their own stars.

It’s so close and yet so very far?

The distance to our nearest neighbor star, “Proxima Centauri” is only 4.24 light years . Ok in miles, each light year is 5,865,696,000,000 miles (that is a really big number) so if you multiply that by 4.24, then you’ll know how many miles to the closest star. It gets super interesting when you think that the other approximately 400 billion stars in the Milky Way are all “much further” to us then Proxima Centauri and very much so in fact.

All that is just in our own galaxy of stars of course so everything else is further on entirely different scales. There are hundreds of billions of Galaxies, just as large as the Milky Way.  So like I said, we are tiny. Now when you again consider the Milky Way could have as many as 50 “billion” planets, and as many as 500 million habitable zone worlds, then the jaw really begins to drop to the floor.  Suddenly life beyond Earth is no longer possible it actually becomes “very” likely and even dare I say, plentiful?  Of course I no longer have to make the argument about extra terrestrial life. Thank you Dr. Richard B. Hoover an astrobiologist at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. What does this incredible discovery mean?

I’m talking about the big picture, of our understanding of our own place in the universe? Well it means something we already knew, life is amazing, resilient and we are all lucky enough to be a part of a magic time in history where a scientist can openly share a ground breaking discovery and not be thrown in prison by religious fanatics.  It also means that we are of course not alone and that perhaps we should all pay a little more attention to the beautiful night time sky.

Will we ever communicate with an intelligent species?  I am not sure but I think so.  Since our own species is a part of the natural world I believe all the same rules apply.  Maybe one day we will hear a voice coming from the blackness of space across the great void like a frog singing across a quiet pond. When they first sing early in the season there are few, but quickly are joined by many others across the untold distance of their domain and eventually thousands of singing frogs join in for the beautiful nightly chorus.

Perhaps one day that’s what it will be like for us beginning with a faint call of a distant species looking to connect.  In time more and more until our songs unite our species across space and time.

Not yet though, this first discovery seems to be more about ancient fossilized bacteria blasted into space from some distant world and eventually raining down here on Earth with a meteor so we won’t be striking up a conversation any time soon.   It does mean though we are now entering a new time. From now on we can stop saying “if” and start asking “when”.

That’s exciting to someone like me.

One of the greatest joys of my life is finding a new species that I didn’t know about.

With the millions if not billions of forms of life on our own world just imagine what could be out there…

Maybe one day there will be a “Nature Walks in Space” episode… hey- you never know!

Mark Fraser

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org

Youtube

http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark

Twitter

http://twitter.com/NWWMARK

Facebook

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407

Facebook #2

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile

Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!

http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/

Nature Walks with Mark Blog

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized 28 Comments »

Native Wild Flowers a magic place

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

These days many of us are caught up in the hustle and bustle of our daily lives hardly noticing the goings on in a forest or swamp. Even within feet of our own homes wildlife continue to carve out a niche. At night while we sleep many species begin their moonlit search for food. Life in the wild can be tough especially these days where their habitats are so very fragmented between the ever growing developments of humankind.

I know many of us wonder “how could I help” sometimes thinking that the big picture is out of our hands. Some even think that there’s an agency or government group that will come by and save the day however that is not going to be the case. You see each of us individually contribute to the problem and therefore, we are each part of the “key” that will unlock the solution.  The fact is “you” do matter and “your” input is critically important.

What if we looked at our residential development in a brand new way where we consider our overall ecological impact? Is that so radical of a thought? The good news is that when you actually think about it, it’s really not very difficult at all.

We could look at each of our own yards as eco-friendly habitats where birds were safe from toxic poisons like lawn chemicals. We could inspire native plant species to thrive and therefore help insects as well.  These simple steps only make our yards much more beautiful and allot healthier then a chemical filled nearly sterile lawn. For example, imagine if every home created something as simple and beautiful as a native wildflower garden section right in the yard. This would allow pollinators like wild native bees and many other insects to find a source of food. That in turn creates food for birds and so on. Simple steps like this can make an enormous positive impact on a very large scale when you think of the big picture and make a great contribution to the health of wildlife species that live right in our own backyard. You see that is something “you” can personally work on taking care of your part, in the big picture.  If many of us did this throughout a community we can make a huge impact, this can grow to a national or even a global scale. That’s the power of working together as a collective. It’s a trick found in nature from ants and Bees as well as many species around the Earth. There is strength in numbers and it all starts with each one doing their part. That means both you and me right in our own backyard.

Choose not to use chemicals and research the impact they have on birds and other species that can eat poisoned insects and even unknowingly feed them to their young ones. You see your part in keeping the world green, clean and healthy literally depends on your choices and your ability to share those good choices. If you allow for a “green patch” of wild flowers and share that story with others you may actually inspire them to do the same.

Then the idea can grow wild, on its own, just like the flowers themselves. If you have children show them the magic of all the different species that live in your native wildflower garden and research the many species you may find there.

You may even find unexpected things like Eft Newt, Frogs and countless others species. There’s a magical world of wonder to be found even in small patches of native wild flowers and you can help protect wildlife with something that takes no more effort than to simply not mow it down.

It seems like a wonderful trade when you think about it!

Mark Fraser

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org

Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark
Twitter
http://twitter.com/NWWMARK
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407
Facebook #2
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile
Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!
http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/
Nature Walks with Mark Blog

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized 37 Comments »

The world is what we create

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

Nature- the word itself stirs the imagination in each of us. The more wild a region is, the more “pristine” a forest, then the more incredibly beautiful we perceive it. That love of the natural world is something I find with people from around the entire planet from every culture I have ever encountered.

Maybe there is something more to that, something deeper than what meets the eye. I mean why is it that we see a clean and healthy river as beautiful, yet a pile of discarded tires or batteries as ugly. From a biological standpoint is it possible there is something more instinctive at play here?  Deep down inside each of us there seems to be some lessons learned long ago that we each have buried within our brains.

That is what “beauty” actually is – isn’t it? The word describes a feeling; the feeling is created by our brains giving us positive stimulation. Why is it doing that? What’s the point?

Well it boils down to something important, the survival of ourselves as individuals and on the big picture, our entire species.  Eating poison is bad, rotten things are seen as ugly etc. It protects us so that we may live on. In the same way that bad feelings may warn us about pending danger and help protect us from harm the good feelings may also help by showing us the way. A natural built-in compass we are given to navigate through life.

Now let’s get back to the beauty of nature. Not long ago I rented a small aircraft to fly over a wilderness area and view it from above. As I looked over the millions of trees below I actually could feel my eyes well up with tears as if something long lost was remembered, something I yearned for. I even choked a bit trying to have a conversation with the pilot. It feels wholesome and “right” to look over a massive swath of healthy trees or to admire a Whale and hear its beautiful song.  It “feels” good.  You see nature is giving us a compass teaching each of us what is right from what is wrong.  So “why” would nature’s built in bio-compass teach us that we should protect the health of the forests or the sea?  It seems common sense really; we simply won’t have a future without the natural world. Just like teaching us to avoid poison is it so hard to imagine nature is teaching us to avoid destroying the habitat that we are connected too for our own survival? When we level a forest, exploit and damage the sea we are impacting our future as a species and that is very ugly. So follow your instincts – admire an ancient old-growth tree- smell the Balsams and Pine in the forest. Know that wonderful feeling you get is something more than just a great day about to happen. It’s the Earth itself talking directly to you, to each of us.

I sometimes wonder if wildlife that is certainly watching us walk through the forest on a hike or kayaking along is thinking “are they getting it yet?”  Perhaps one day more of us will pay attention to our biological -compass and navigate through life in a way that allows our wild neighbors to walk, swim and fly right beside us.  For now, we are literally at a cross roads in the evolution of our species.  We have never in history been more capable of both great things on a massive scale and also global destruction at the same time.  If we choose poorly and don’t listen to our compass I fear one day the ambers of our own species will shine no more like so many other species before us. If we choose well, we will enjoy a long and happy future on the very special living world we call both home and “Mother”, Earth.

Mark Fraser

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org

Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark
Twitter
http://twitter.com/NWWMARK
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407
Facebook #2
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile
Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!
http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/
Nature Walks with Mark Blog

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized 40 Comments »

The Brilliance of Autumn

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

Most of my life I have lived in the North Country in one area or another. That has allowed me to appreciate the brilliant fall colors during their annual return. Sure the autumn is brief, but certainly everyone will agree it is by far the most beautiful of seasons. The weather and moisture can have a huge effect on the fall colors. If the season is too wet, fungus like tar spots and anthracnose can create brown patches on the leaves.  Wind storms can remove the leaves too early in the season. This year in 2010, everything was just right in Mother Nature’s kitchen and the fall is absolutely breathtaking.

The colors on a sunny day are so bright that I have on many occasions had the vibrant yellow and brilliant reds seemingly burned into my vision after walking through the forest and I’ll have splashes of color in my mind for weeks to come.  The nights are just right for sitting by a campfire and that allows us to listen to the sounds of the forest. Species from Owls to Coy-wolves sing to the night giving us the magic sound of the chilly autumn nights.  

Wooly bear caterpillars can be seen roaming the ground across the autumn leaves and ungulates like Deer and Moose are engaged in the rut so the bucks are boasting their striking antlers as they fight for the right to procreate.  There is something wonderful about the change of seasons. A cyclic change happening each year and if you were raised in a part of the world where you can enjoy this phenomenon then every few months you’ll seem to naturally expect even yearn for the pending change.

As autumn quickly passes by, we see the leaves earn their namesake and “Fall” until all deciduous trees are bare, remaining dormant until the following spring.  This survival tactic has allowed them to survive the harsh cold of winter. Conifers keep their needles and are protected from frost with a natural wax coating. The same trees are a crucial survival food for species during winter like Red Squirrels who are safe in their dens with food caches of “Pine Nuts” loaded with Vitamin C that represent  a great food for them.

Some species like Wood frogs are able to “freeze” nearly solid to survive winter and only their most vital organs are barley thawed until spring when they come back to life.

Insects hide in the bark of trees and Black Bear prepare their dens where they will rest off and on through the winter months.

The autumn is both a time of beauty and a time of change.  Each year I look forward to it, and often I will later reflect on it. Soon the colors of autumn will be gone and the world will again change this time to the white blanket of snow covering the leaves that are now falling.

They will decompose into the soil, returning their nutrients into the Earth as they continue a cycle that has happened since long before any human roamed the Earth.

I love all the seasons each for their own natural beauty but of all, the autumn gives us the wonder and joy of appreciating the beautiful painting Mother Nature creates for us each and every year.

Mark Fraser

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org

Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark
Twitter
http://twitter.com/NWWMARK
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407
Facebook #2
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile
Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!
http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/
Nature Walks with Mark Blog
http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized No Comments »

Social Media and Conservation

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

In our lives we are faced with so many challenges in today’s super hi-tech society. The new generations are growing up with social media like Facebook and Twitter being part of their daily lives. Films on Youtube are replacing their televisions and Smart phones seem to be able day able to even replace the almighty home computer. Information is now available at speeds beyond the collective imagination of the kids of even my own childhood.

The fast paced change of today’s world creates so many questions however like everything in life, I look to nature for examples and guidance.  You see with millions of years of evolution there really is no greater teacher then the natural world itself – that is of course if we all simply choose to listen.

Nature teaches us that species who adapt to change survive and even thrive while those who do not adapt are in trouble. Like the changing climate, social media is a shift in the sociological weather pattern. A new paradigm where information and communication create a global network that like it or not, we are all a part of.

We often think “how could technology be natural?” I mean isn’t anything made by people unnatural by definition? Well consider this; we ourselves are “of” this world. We are a species on this planet, made of the same material with the same origins of all things on the Earth. So if that’s true, then perhaps social media is a natural step in the growth of humankind?

To put it another way, let’s look at Spring Peepers, a small northern frog that happens to live in my area of the northeastern United States. After winters long chill leaves us, and the air is still brisk you will begin to here a faint call of 1 or 2 frogs singing their beautiful high pitched call.

As the days and weeks follow, more and more frogs call out until it sounds like one massive song made up of thousands of individual frogs.

What if the social media of today used in our own lives, is really no different than the call of the frogs and other species trying to communicate? It creates a way of reaching out across the darkness and distance allowing us to call out to each other? Perhaps we are a species coming out of the winter of our own evolution and instant global communication is the next step like so many frogs using sound waves to communicate across an entire pond. So in that way it is also natural it’s just that In our example we happen to  sing “communicate” our spring song on Facebook, Twitter and Youtube.

Social media changes social consciousness:
The impact of media and how we are raised can’t be overstated. Our culture and beliefs around the world provide a social compass as we navigate through our lives. We are very much products of our environment.  This is so powerful that behaviors that one culture may see as wrong or ethically bad, in other cultures are considered completely normal. That’s why Cannibals and the Pizza delivery person have the same genes. They are not born different, they simply “learned” differently. So in conclusion, what happens to the social media society of today if we don’t get involved and teach important life lessons like protecting wildlife habitat? Well, we run the risk of creating a gluttonous society capable of self destruction, like a cannibal.  If we are “involved” with social media ensuring the important “life lessons” are still a part of the information we teach our children and ourselves, then our world has a great future where clean waters and forests, wildlife and even ourselves can still exist. I like that future…

Mark Fraser

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org

Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark
Twitter
http://twitter.com/NWWMARK
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407
Facebook #2
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile
Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!
http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/
Nature Walks with Mark Blog
http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized 27 Comments »

Dragonfly

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

Lately, I have been paying close attention to the details of the many species of Dragonfly that can be seen swarming on these long hot summer nights.

They seem to be having a population boom as of late. I assume with the longer hotter weather lately there is more food for them, so that makes allot of sense.

The more you look at these incredible insects the more fascinating they really are. Just imagine millions of years ago during the Carboniferous period the fossil records indicate there were species of Dragonfly as large as a Seagull with a wingspan of 2.5 feet!

Even today we see species that boast a very impressive size in fact, the largest of the species these days still has wingspans over 7 inches which for an insect is enormous in its own right.

They are among the fastest of all flying insects and some species like the Green Darner have been clocked at over 50 MPH!  Larger Dragonfly like the Darners actually live for several years and since they feed in the north country where the pending winter will mean no insect prey for them, they actually have evolved to migrate like birds traveling up to 80 miles in a day!

The smaller species live shorter life spans so migration is out of the question.

There are countless kinds of dragonfly with some of the most beautiful color patterns found in nature. A literal biological rainbow with species names like Yellow Winged Darter, Emperor, Downy Emerald, Common Hawker, Banded Pennant and one of my favorite Dragonfly names “Meadowhawk” as well as countless others.

These incredible insects start their lives in the water as a very effective aquatic hunter called a nymph. Complete with external jaws they much on everything they can find up to and including small fish! Then after in some cases up to the 3 years, they crawl from the water and molt their skin turning into the amazing species we know and enjoy.

In the North Country in early Spring, rings the dinner bell for a biting fly called the “Black fly”. Every hiker in May knows this species very well and dreads the pending swarms which are among the most antagonistic of all biting flies. Within a couple weeks of their arrival, as if timed to an ancient biological alarm clock the Dragonfly return feasting on these insects. In fact they are so efficient that within a short amount of time the reign of the Black fly is over as quick as it came.  The fact is that Dragonfly are a very important species that take up a niche within the ecosystem where us humans directly benefit.

So the next time your on a nature walk take the time to admire these spectacular examples of “Mother Nature’s” finest!

PS:The image on the right reminds me of a helicopter pilot hahaha.

Mark Fraser

http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org

Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark
Twitter
http://twitter.com/NWWMARK
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407
Facebook #2
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile
Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!
http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/
Nature Walks with Mark Blog
http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized 33 Comments »

A “Wild” bond we all share

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

During my life I have been fortunate enough to have had the ability to travel. Nothing crazy mind you, but certainly enough to greatly expand the areas where I could take some time to observe and study the local wildlife and fauna. I remember long ago being in Central America in the Panamanian jungle for a couple of months.  During that time, I had the honor of seeing so many species that make their home in the tropical double canopy jungle environment. I remember walking through a river almost neck deep in the water and the local crocodilian species of “Caiman” were sliding into the water from the banks. I had incorrectly thought that they never grew larger then 4ft in length… whoops hahahaha. The excitement of the moments of discovery and awe of the wild world enlightens the mind and charges the senses. When we are in a forest or jungle long enough our ears and eyes seem to spring to life and the sound of the wind in the trees is suddenly a dramatic and beautiful event.

When I speak with people from around the world about wildlife, I am always amazed that deep down “all” of us are just as fascinated. Even when I have met people that at first seem as if they don’t care, I find that they have simply become so busy day to day that they have forgotten the joy of wonder and discovery found in nature. Within minutes of sharing a film and talking about a wild moment I see in their faces that deep down they care also and are really just as fascinated as the rest of us. You see, nature really does bind us all around the planet. It has “always” been a part of our lives and “always” will be. When humans first began to speak you can bet those early people were making sounds to mimic birds and animals. Probably allot better then I can do (not from lack of trying) :-) .

Taking the time to teach our children about local wildlife is absolutely paramount towards the future health of the entire world. Remember, our children will grow up and make the decisions about how we use our future natural resources. From learning about the species of fish in a local brook to learning about the backyard birds at the feeder and everything in between it will ensure an admiration that will often blossom into real heartfelt conservation. It works no matter where you are from; remember admiration for wildlife is a wild bond we each share. We just need to take the time to do exactly that.

Mark Fraser

Main website
http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org
Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark
Twitter
http://twitter.com/NWWMARK
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407
Facebook #2
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile
Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!
http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/
Nature Walks with Mark Blog
http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized No Comments »

Make it count!

Mark Fraser is the host and executive producer of "Nature Walks with Mark Fraser"

Let’s face it, life is really short. Regardless of who we are or where we come from we have a brief chance to make the best of our own lives. Appreciating every simple pleasure from a sunrise to a passing bird is the secret sauce to life. We are remembered by our kids and those in which we have made an impression on during our lives. The bigger the impression the longer we are remembered and eventually in time, like a long lost flake of snow belonging to a previous winter we melt away in time returning to the place in which we all came from. What kind of story will they tell about your life, how will you be remembered? How long will that memory of your life last? One generation, perhaps four generations, and then what? How far back in your own family can you remember or know the story of those who came before we did. Paying attention to the elderly is one of the best ways to gain insight and wisdom during our lives but how many of us do. They have so much to teach us and remember they have been through far more “life” then we have. Learning from their experiences helps us navigate in our own lives and knowing the stories that they remember carries the torch of the lessons of so long ago. To many first nations of North America, it’s said that people should try to leave the world better then you found it for the next 7 generations. What a thought, being stewards of the land in such a way that world is protected for so very long after we are gone. There is a lot of wisdom in that. *Making our lives count* and leaving the world better then we find it.

I have to wonder if any of us are really doing that in today’s world.  I myself have a smart phone attached to my hip. What happens when it no longer works and I must dispose of it, where do those hazardous chemicals go? There are so many examples of that in our lives it boggles the mind. Simple innocent ways in which we live our modern life that can unknowingly lead to long term environmental impacts. We have a long, long way to go!

There is good news: you see nature has been around for a very long time. We are the new kids on the block and in the end we are the ones who will live with the choices that we make as a society and as a species.

I very much believe in “hope” itself and I believe deep down we all know that we need to be better stewards of the land. It’s the “what can I do” mentality that makes some of us feel overwhelmed or that there isn’t hope. The truth is you can do plenty! In today’s world information is nothing more then a quick search online. Educate yourself to the simple steps that can be made in your own life to help. Conservation really does start with “you”. Think about that, if we each ensure our own homes make sound decisions then collectively we correct the big picture. That’s what they mean when they say “Think global act local”. Get to know and appreciate the natural world in your own backyard as much as you can because that “is” the world we are trying to protect. In time we will all be a little greener and a lot happier.

Mark Fraser

Main website
http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org
Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/user/nwwmark
Twitter
http://twitter.com/NWWMARK
Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/people/Mark-Fraser/1351660407
Facebook #2
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/nwwmark?ref=profile
Pacific and Atlantic Garbage patch website!
http://www.garbagepatchcleaner.org/
Nature Walks with Mark Blog
http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org/blog/

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized 30 Comments »